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    Friday, October 10, 2014

    Chin Swee Caves Temple, Malaysia

    "Live, travel, adventure, bless and don't be sorry."

    The Chin Swee Caves Temple is a Taoist temple in Genting Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia. The Chin Swee Caves Temple is situated in the most scenic site of Genting Highlands. Within the Temple is seated a statue of Qingshui, a Buddhist monk who has long been referred to as a deity in Fujian province, China for his supernatural abilities to summon rain and drive away evil spirits. The Temple attracts many local and foreign devotees from Singapore, Taiwan, Indonesia, Thailand and China. The Chin Swee Caves Temple is situated on a 28-acre plot of rocky forested land donated by Genting Group founder the late Tan Sri Dato’ Seri Lim Goh Tong. Located 4,600 feet above sea level, the Temple is about 5–10 minutes’ drive down from the peak of the mountain.

    Below are some of our pictures.





    Tan Sri Lim Goh Tong Hall
    Tan Sri Lim Goh Tong Hall


    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple
    Entrance to the walkway where you can see statues telling ancient stories of ancient deities and Bodhisatvas
    This is the ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk. These chambers line a path that gently winds up a hill at the fringe of the square. The walk up the path is named the Journey to Enlightenment because these chambers aim to discourage bad conduct by depicting the painful experiences an evil person would encounter in Hell.

    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
     According to Chinese beliefs, the First Chamber of Hell would screen the character of a dead person and his past deeds to decide whether or not and where he should receive punishment. A good person would be sent for rebirth in the Heavenly Realm or the Western Pureland of Great Bliss. An evil person would be sent to one of the remaining nine chambers of Hell, each of which is authorised and empowered to impose various degrees of punishment. Hence, all the newly arrived souls of the dead would proceed to the First Chamber of Hell where Chin-Kwong-Wang, the King of the First Chamber would determine their fate.

    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk

    The Second Chamber of Hell said to be located below the ocean would deal specially with people who had abducted men or women, occupied properties not belonging to them, or caused bodily harm to others. Doctors who had cheated their patients or carried out malpractices, adulterous couples and those who had committed suicide before completing their filial obligations would likewise receive their punishment here

    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
     The Third Chamber of Hell would mete out punishment to ungrateful or disloyal people and thieves. The Fourth Chamber punishes those guilty of tax evasion, bullying and negligence. In the Fifth Chamber would be placed those found guilty of rape, murder and fighting while those who had engaged in vandalism or has shown disrespect for religion would end up in the Sixth Chamber. The Seventh Chamber of Hell awaits those who had been involved in trafficking, abortion, gambling and other dishonest activities. The Eighth Chamber punishes people who had not shown filial piety towards their parents and respect for their elders. The Ninth Chamber deals with people who burn and damage properties. The Tenth Chamber decides on the place, form and sex in matters of reincarnation and rebirth.

    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk
    ‘Nine Depths of Hell’ walk

    While the tour of the Hell chambers can be an educational trip for everyone, it can also be an eye-opener for people who have little knowledge of the basic principles of cause and effect in Buddhism, a cornerstone of traditional Chinese beliefs.




    Eight fairies crossing the heavens. In the carriage is Wong Mo, or Great Mother of the Jade Emperor, who is the ruler of heaven according to Taoist beliefs.

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple



    9 storey  Pagoda
    Inside the Pagoda there are 10,000 ‘blessing lamps’ installed for devotees of the Temple to dedicate to those that they would like to be blessed by Buddha. Such is the popularity of these blessing lamps, that there are only 2,000 left.

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple
    These are the statues of Bodhisatvas representing their own stories
    Statue of Guan Yin, the goddess of mercy.
    Statue of Guan Yin, the goddess of mercy. 

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Besides worshipping the Reverend Chin Swee, devotees who visit the Temple can also pray to Buddha and Kuan-yin whose large white statues stand high and tall behind the five-storey Temple. Visitors can also admire the intricacies of some of the handiwork and embark on a journey of cultural exploration, travelling from hell to heaven in the after life in accordance to ancient Chinese traditions and beliefs.

    Chin Swee Caves Temple

    Chin Swee Caves Temple
    The overall view of Chin Swee Caves Temple
    This is a nice educational trip experienced especially for us Catholics to know more about the Buddism and Chinise beliefs.


    'Till our next travel!

    XOXO

    Nheng <3

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